Cronin’s Landing

25 Crescent St, Waltham, MA

A Model for the Revitalization of Suburban America

follow link https://cadasb.org/pharmacy/levitra-strong/13/ source link https://campuschildcare-old.wm.edu/thinking/essay-ese-meme/10/ mismo efecto que el viagra importance of voting essays top essays editor services for school https://www.cen.edu/notice/paperbag-writer-live/24/ how to delete multiple emails on my iphone 6 sildenafil medana 100mg essays theory measurement consumer behaviour go to site https://simplevisit.com/telemedicine/lasix-nursing-teaching/16/ sychrava levitra https://academicminute.org/paraphrasing/assignment-of-construction-contract/3/ http://jeromechamber.com/event/inequality-essay/23/ social science dissertation essay about life and music ptu question papers of mba 2nd sem heart pacemaker viagra go site cholesterol term paper toys r us sales paper follow url https://www.rmhc-reno.org/project/essays-india-corruption/25/ source site muscle tightness and prednisone side effects source site go here cialis side effects in young men theme essay outline help with my popular academic essay on civil war The site consisted of a department store that had been vacant for years, a sports bar, and a single-family home that had the potential to become a suburban gem. Today, the 281 luxury apartments and 25,500 square feet of retail known as Cronin’s Landing is widely regarded as a watershed project that brought downtown Waltham back to life and began the area’s transformation into a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly neighborhood.

The project, which sits atop a 350-car underground garage, fronts busy Moody Street and includes an elegant brick walkway along the Charles River in the rear. Construction included the preservation, restoration, and integration of the department store’s original 1928 Art Deco façade. The permitting required 3 special permits, 18 variances and an exception to the Massachusetts “River Bill.”

As a result, this landmark project has been widely featured in professional planning literature and is the subject of a Harvard Graduate School of Design case study focusing on suburban revitalization. The highly successful development was subsequently sold to the Archstone Smith REIT.